Art, Conversation

The Believer Interview: Ice Cube

Most of the problems that we have are brought on by the government and not by music. Music is a mirror of what we’re going through, not the cause of what we’re going through. It’s a reaction, it’s our only weapon, it’s our only way to protect ourselves, it’s our only way to fit, it’s our only way to get there. But that’s all right, music kind of thrives on talking about what’s the problem, you know, sometimes glorifying it. You know, when you’re in this pool of poverty and lower education, pretty soon you start wearing all that as a badge. “I’m from the poorest area, I’m from the slums, I came from nothing.” That becomes a badge of honor.

→ Longreads

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Society

The Craiglist Killers

That’s it? Confess to God and then you’re in heaven?

He nodded. That’s it.

He asked one more thing, though, at the end of our visit. Please ask people to write me, he said. I may be able to counsel them in their lives. And if I could communicate with men outside these walls, he said, it would make me feel free, too.

→ GQ

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Art

Jeff Koons Is the Most Successful American Artist Since Warhol.

Much has always been made of the fact that Koons is in league with the plutocrats and once worked on Wall Street, selling commodities. But he’s always been quick to refuse the art world’s carefully patrolled shibboleths—that work has personal meaning, that it must contain some social criticism, that it express ambivalence about the art market. Koons does not make ambivalent work, which is his way of giving people what they actually enjoy: a lavishly elevated version of mass-cultural charisma.

→ Vulture

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Cinema, Society

The Six Degrees Of Sharon Tate, Mao, McQueen, Manson and Mad Men…

On the afternoon of August 7, 1969, Sebring went to McQueen’s house to give him a trim and suggested they attend a party that evening at Sharon’s house. McQueen said he’d be there. Before setting out, however, he was called by a young and beautiful blonde he was seeing at the time. Come along to the party, he said — but she told him she had a better idea for just the two of them.

→ The Selvedge Yard

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Technology

The Science of Paper versus Screens

Psychologists distinguish between remembering something—which is to recall a piece of information along with contextual details, such as where, when and how one learned it—and knowing something, which is feeling that something is true without remembering how one learned the information. Generally, remembering is a weaker form of memory that is likely to fade unless it is converted into more stable, long-term memory that is “known” from then on. When taking the quiz, volunteers who had read study material on a monitor relied much more on remembering than on knowing, whereas students who read on paper depended equally on remembering and knowing. Garland and her colleagues think that students who read on paper learned the study material more thoroughly more quickly; they did not have to spend a lot of time searching their minds for information from the text, trying to trigger the right memory—they often just knew the answers.

→ Scientific American

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